Lists most used words

Download Basic Spanish -English Dictionary for Spanish I and II below:
BASIC-SPANISH-ENGLISH-DICTIONARY for I and II

SUPER SEVEN STRUCTURES TO LEARN

Location (to be at a place) — estar
Existence (to exist somewhere, “there is”) — hay
Possession (to have something) — tener
Identity (to be something or someone) — ser
Preference (to like or dislike something) — gustar
Motion (to go somewhere) — ir/correr/caminar
Volition (to feel like doing something) — querer

100 Most used words in Spanish
http://www.100spanishwords.com/

100 Most used verbs in Spanish
http://www.100spanishverbs.com/

20,000 words in Spanish in 20 minutes
http://www.knowspanish.com/

Las palabras pequeñas pero muy importantes…

a, an
about
after
already
also
and
at
because
before
but
by
during
even
everyone
everything
except
for
from
in
less
many
more
much
no one
none
not any
un, una
de, sobre
después
ya
también
y
a, en
porque
antes
pero
por
durante
aún
todos
todo
excepto
para / por
de
en
menos
muchos, muchas
más
mucho, mucha
nadie
ningún, ninguna
ningunos, ningunas
not ever
nothing
on
only
or
since
so…
so (big)
somesomeone
something
still
that (conjunction)
that (before noun)
this
the
these
those
through
too  (also)
too (much)
while
with
with me
with you
without
jamás
nada
en
sólo
o
desde
así que, pues…
tan (grande)
algunos, algunas
unos, unas
alguien
algo
todavía
que
ese, esa
este, esta
el, la, los, las
estos, estas
esos, esas
por
también
demasiado/a
mientras
con
conmigo
contigo
sin

50 words = 60% of speech 

1,000 words = 85% of speech

Verbs = 20% of the language

How many of these do you know?

1. el, la – the 2. de – of, from
3. que – that, which 4. y – and
5. a – to, at 6. en – in, on
7. un, una – a, an 8. ser – to be
9. se – itself/yourself/himself/herself 10. no – no, not
11. hay – there is/are (from haber also used for this: to have + past participle) 12. por – by, for, through
13. con – with 14. su – his/her/their/your
15. para – for, to, in order to 16. como – like, as
17. estar – to be 18. tener – to have
19. le – to it/you/him/her 20. lo – the + adj.
21. lo – it, him 22. todo – all, every, whole
23. pero – but 24. más – more
25. hacer – to do, make 26. o – or
27. poder – to be able to; can 28. decir – to tell, say
29. este – this 30. ir – to go
31. otro – other, another 32. ese – that
33. la – it, her 34. si – if, whether
35. me – me 36. ya – already, still
37. ver – to see 38. porque – because
39. dar – to give 40. cuando – when
41. él (ellos) – he, him, it (they, them) 42. muy – very, really
43. sin – without 44. vez – time
45. mucho – much, many, a lot 46. saber – to know, find out
47. qué – what?, how + adj.! 48. sobre – on top of, over, about
49. mi – my 50. alguno – some

How many of these verbs do you know?

Top 50 High Frequency Verbs

How many do you know?

buscar – to look for
conocer – to know, to meet
contar – to count, to tell
creer – to believe
dar – to give
deber – to owe, should
decir – to tell, to say
dejar – to let, to leave
empezar – to begin
encontrar – to find
entrar – to enter
escribir – to write
esperar – to hope, to wait for
estar – to be
existir – to exist
haber –to have + p.p., there is/are
hablar – to speak, to talk
hacer – to do, to make
ir – to go
leer – to read
llamar – to call
llegar – to arrive
llevar – to carry
mirar – to look, to watch
ocurrir – to occur
oír – to hear
parecer – to seem, to look like
pasar – to pass, to spend time
pedir – to ask for
pensar – to think
perder – to lose
poder – to be able to, can
poner – to put, get + adj.
producir – to produce
quedar – to stay
querer – to want, to love
recibir – to receive
saber – to know, to find out
salir – to leave
seguir – to follow
sentir – to feel
ser – to be
tener – to have
tomar – to take, to drink
trabajar – to work
tratar – to try
venir – to come
ver – to see
vivir – to live
volver – to return

Here are some of the most high frequency verbs in Spanish according to Mark Davies in A Frequency Dictionary of Spanish (number in parentheses indicates word frequency in Spanish):

High Frequency Verbs in Spanish

Spanish Synonyms to Sound like a Native

Good

Bad

comprensivo
estupendo
excelente
excepcional
fabuloso
fenomenal
honesto
inocente
justo
maravilloso
súper
terrífico
tierno
virtuoso
understanding
stupendous
excellent
exceptional
fabulous
phenomenal
honest
innocent
just / fair
marvelous
super
terrific
tender
virtuous
cruel
culpable
desagradable
diabólico
grosero
horrible
injusto
insorportable
malo
molesto
ofensivo
perverso
terrible
cruel
guilty
disagreeable
diabolical
rude
horrible
unjust /unfair
unbearable
bad/ evil
annoying
offensive
perverse
terrible

Like / Love

Don’t Like / Hate

Admiro
Adoro
Amo
Aprecio
Deseo
Disfruto
Gozo
Me encanta
Me gusta
Quiero
Respeto
I admire
I adore
I love
I appreciate
I desire
I enjoy
I enjoy
I love
I like
I love; want
I respect
Me aburre
Me apena
Me enfada
Me insulta
Me irrita
Me molesta
Me ofende
No me gusta
Odio
It bores me
It pains me.
It angers me.
It insults me.
It bothers me.
It annoys me.
It offends me
I don’t like
I hate

Big

Little / Small

amplio
colosal
considerable
enorme
extraordinario
gigante
gigantesco
grande
monstruoso
monumental
tremendo
vasto
ample
colossal
considerable
enormous
extraordinary
giant
gigantic
big
monstruous
monumental
tremendous
vast
bajo
chico
corto
diminutivo
enano
minúsculo
pequeño
poco
short
small
short (length)
diminutive
dwarf
miniscule
small (size)
few/little (amt)

Nice

Mean

adorable
agradable
amable
ameno
bueno
dulce
elegante
lindo
precioso
satisfactorio
simpático
adorable
nice
kind
pleasant
good
sweet
elegant
nice/lovely
precious
satisfactory
nice (personality
abusivo
amenazador
antipático
cruel
infame
intimidante
insoportable
malo
ofensivo
sarcástico
abusive
threatening
mean
cruel
vile
intimidating
unbearable
bad / evil
offensive
sarcastic

 

Happy

Sad

afortunado
alegre
bendito
boyante
contento
emocionante
encantado
extático
feliz
festivo
jovial
radiante
satisfecho
fortunate
happy
blessed
buoyant
content
excited
enchanted
ecstatic
happy
festive /merry
jovial
radiant
satisfied
deprimido
desafortunado
desesperado
emocionado
lamentable
lloroso
miserable
patético
torturado
trágico
triste
depressed
unfortunate
desperate
emotional
lamentable
weeping
miserable
pathetic
tortured
tragic
sad

Pretty

Ugly

atractivo
bello
bonito
elegante
exótico
guapo
hermoso
lindo
precioso
attractive
beautiful
pretty
elegant
exotic
good-looking
beautiful
lovely
precious
feo
horrible
monstruoso
repelente
repugnante
ugly
horrible
monstruous
repellent
repugnant

Calm

Scary

apatético
calmo
indiferente
plácido
relajado
sereno
tranquilo
apathetic
calm
indifferent
placid
relaxed
serene
tranquil
alarmante
aterrador
espantoso
horrible
increíble
sorprendente
terrorífico
alarming
frightening
scary
horrible
incredible
surprising
terrifying

To say

To Look / To watch

anunciar
contar
decir
declarar
expresar
gritar
informar
mencionar
opinarproponer
recitar
suponer
susurrar
to announce
to tell/count
to say/tell
to declare
to express
to yell
to inform
to mention
to have an
opinion
to propose
to recite
to suppose
to whisper
cuidar
estar en   guardia
estudiar
examinar
mirar
notar
observar
ver
to take care of
to be on guardto study
to examine
to look at
to note
to observe
to see

_________________________________________________________________
List of English words of Spanish origin:

A

abaca
via Spanish abacá from Tagalog abaká
abalone
from Spanish abulón, from Ohlone aluan or Rumsen awlun.
adios
from Spanish ‘adios’ meaning “goodbye”
adobe
From Egyptian via Arabic “Al-tub”
aficionado
from French ‘amateur’ “unprofessional person” or “affection” too.
albatross
from alcatraz, see below.
Alcatraz
(meaning “gannet”) from Arabic غطاس al-ġaţţās (“the diver”)
alidade
via French, Spanish alidada and Medieval Latin alhidade from Arabic العهدة al-idada, “the revolving radius”
alligator
from el lagarto, “the lizard”
alpaca
from Spanish, from Aymara allpaka/allpaqa
aludel
from Old French alutel, via Spanish and Medieval Latin from Arabic الأثال al-ʾuṯāl, “the sublimation vessel”
amigo – from Spanish and/or Portuguese amigo, “friend”; from Latin amicus meaning “friend,” derived from amare (to love).
amole
Mexican Spanish from Nahautl amolli meaning “soap root.”[1]
amontillado – from the village of Montilla, Province of Córdoba, Spain
ancho
from Mexican Spanish (chile) ancho, “wide (chili)”
anchovy
from Spanish anchoa or more probably Portuguese anchova meaning “bluefish”; from Genoese or Corsican dialect; ultimately from Latin apua meaning “small fish” and Greek Αφυε aphye meaning “small fry” or from Basque anchuva meaning “dry”[2]
Angeleno
from American Spanish
Apache
from Mexican Spanish from Yavapai ´epache meaning “people” or from Zuni apachu” meaning “enemy”[3]
armada – “armed [fleet]” from the Spanish navy, La armada española
armadillo
from armadillo, “little armored one”
arroyo
from arroyo, “stream”
avocado
alteration of Spanish aguacate, from Nahuatl ahuacatl which also means “testicle” in that language.
ayahuasca
via Spanish from Quechua ayawaska meaning “soul vine.”

B

banana
from Spanish or Portuguese banana, probably from a Wolof word,[4] or from Arabic بأننا “ba’ nana” fingers[5]
bandolier
from Spanish bandolera, meaning “band (for a weapon or other) that crosses from one shoulder to the opposite hip” and bandolero, loosely meaning “he who wears a bandolier”
barbecue
from the Chibcha word barbacoa
barracuda
from barracuda May have come from barraco, meaning overlapping tooth
barranca
from Spanish barranca or barranco, ravine
barrio
from Spanish barrio, “neighborhood”, from Arabic بري barri, wild
bastinado
from bastonada, from Spanish bastón, cane
bodega
from Spanish and/or Portuguese bodega, meaning cellar
bolero
from Spanish bolero
bonanza
from bonanza meaning “prosperity”
bonito
from Spanish bonito, meaning “beautiful”
breeze
from brisa “cold northeast wind” or from Frisian briesen – to blow (wind)[6]
bronco
from bronco meaning “coarse”
buckaroo
from vaquero meaning “cowboy”
burrito
from burrito, a dish originally from Northern Mexico, literally “little donkey”
burro
from burro, “donkey”

C

caballero
from Spanish caballero meaning “knight/gentleman”, from caballo, “horse”, celtic caballos “horse”.
cabana
from Spanish cabaña or Portuguese cabana; both meaning “cabin.”
cacique
from Spanish, from Taino cacike or Arawak kassequa, both meaning a chief
cafeteria
from cafetería, “coffee store”
calaboose
from Vulgar Latin calafodium “to dig a protected place” and Louisiana French calabouse, from Spanish calabozo[7]
caldera (used in geology)
from Spanish caldera meaning “cauldron” from Latin caldaria, “cooking pot.”
California
place name first seen in print in 1510 Spanish novel ‘Las sergas de Esplandián’ by Garci Rodríguez de Montalvo
camarilla
from camarilla, “small room”
camino
from camino a path or road, from celtic cammanos “road”.
cannibal
from Spanish caníbal, alteration of caríbal, from Caribe
canoe
from Spanish canoa, from Haitian canaoua
canyon
from cañón meaning “a pipe, tube, gorge” from cano, “tube;” ultimately from Latin canna meaning “reed.”[8]
carabao
from Spanish from Visayan language kalabaw, from Malay language kerabau.
caramba
from Spanish, meaning “heck”; expression of dread, displeasure, or disapproval, euphemism for carajo
carbonado
from carbonada, from carbón meaning “coal”
cargo
from the verb cargar meaning “to load”
Caribbean
from Spanish Caribe, from name of Carib Indians of the region.
cassava
from cazabe, from Taino caçábi
caudillo
from caudillo, from Latin capitellium “head” meaning “leader”
cedilla
from cedilla, archaic spelling zedilla (little z), “elsewhere”
chaparral
from Spanish, chaparro loosely meaning small evergreen oak, from Basque txapar, “small, short”
chaps
from Mexican Spanish chaparreras, leg protectors for riding through chaparral
chayote
from Spanish, literally: “squash”, from Nahuatl chayotl meaning “spiny squash”
chicha
from Spanish chicha, from Kuna chichab, meaning “maize” or from Nahuatl chichiatl, “fermented water.”
chicle
from chicle “gum”, from Nahuatl tzictli “squishy stuff” or Mayan tsicte.[9]
chile
from Spanish chile, from Nahuatl chilli
chipotle
from Spanish, smoked jalapeño, from Nahuatl chilpoctli
chocolate
from Spanish chocolate, from Nahuatl xocolatl meaning “hot water” or from a combination of the Mayan word chocol meaning “hot” and the Nahuatl word atl meaning “water.”
Choctaw
from the native name Chahta of unknown meaning but also said to come from Spanish chato (=”flattened”) because of the tribe’s custom of flattening the heads of male infants.[10]
chorizo
from chorizo, “saussage”
churro
from churro, “fritter”
cigar
from Spanish cigarro meaning “fag, stogie, stogy”, from Mayan sicar or sic, “tobacco”
cigarette
from French cigarette “little weed”, diminutive of French cigare “stogie”, from Spanish cigarro meaning “fag (UK), stogie, stogy.”
cilantro
from Spanish cilantro, “coriander”
coca
from Spanish, coca meaning “coke”, from Quechua kúka
cockroach
from Spanish cucaracha
cocoa or cacao
from Spanish cacao, from Nahuatl cacáhuatl
Colorado
from Spanish colorado, red or colored
comrade
from French camarade meaning “friend”, from Spanish camarada, “pal, mate”
condor
from Spanish, from Quechua cuntur
conquistador
from conquistador meaning “conquerer”, from conquista, “conquest”
coquina
from coquina, dim. form of “concha” meaning seashell; a sedimentary rock of NE Florida
cordillera
from cordillera, “range”
corral
from corral meaning “pen, yard” from Portuguese curral meaning “pen” of unknown; perhaps ultimately from Afrikaans kraal or from Vulgar Latin currale loosely meaning “enclosure for vehicles.”[11]
corrida
a bullfight (literally: “race”)
coyote
from Spanish coyote, from Nahuatl coyotl
creole
from French créole, from Spanish criollo, from Portuguese crioulo, raised in the house
crimson
from Old Spanish cremesín, via Medieval Latin cremesinus from Arabic قيرميزل qirmizI, from Persian قرمز qermez kermes; ultimately from Sanskrit कृमिज krmi-ja meaning “worm-made.”[12]
crusade
blend of Middle French croisade and Spanish cruzada; both ultimately from Latin cruc-, crux cross
cumbia
from Spanish cumbia, a popular dance (for couples) originating in Colombia, Panama and Argentina

D

daiquiri
from Daiquiri, a port city in eastern Cuba
dengue
from Spanish dengue meaning “fever”, from Swahili dinga, “seizure”
desperado
from Spanish desesperado, desperate

E

El Dorado
from El Dorado, literally, “the golden one”
El Niño
from El Niño de la Navidad, literally, “the Christmas child” due to the warming of Pacific waters seemed to warm around Christmas
embarcadero
from embarcadero a boat dock
embargo
from Spanish embargar, to “seize” or “impound”
escabeche
from escabeche, “pickle”

F

fiesta
from the Spanish fiesta meaning “party”
Florida

from La Florida, the flowery or plant-filled place or pascua florida, “flowery Easter.”

G

gaucho
from Mapuche “Argentine cowboy”
guacamole
via American Spanish from Nahuatl ahuaca-molli (“avocado sauce”)[13]
guerrilla
from Spanish “small war”

H

habanero
from the Spanish for the name of the Cuban city of La Habana, which is known as Havana in English. Although it is not the place of origin, it was frequently traded there.
hacienda
from Old Spanish facienda, “estate”
hackamore
from Spanish jaquima, “halter.”
hombre
from Spanish “hombre” same as man and he-man: macho or very strong, tough, and masculine man.
hoosegow
from Spanish juzgado, courthouse, from juzgar, to judge
hurricane
from Spanish huracán, from Taino hurákan; akin to Arawak kulakani, thunder

I

Inca
from Spanish inca, from Quechua Inka, literally: “lord, king.”[14]
incommunicado
from incomunicado, “in solitary confinement.”
iguana
from Spanish iguana from Arawak iwana.

J

jade
from Spanish piedra de ijada, “stone of flank.”
jalapeño
from Spanish, a type of spicy chilli named after Jalapa de Enríquez, a town in Mexico, and the capital of the state of Veracruz
jerky
from Spanish charqui, from Quechua ch’arki, “dried flesh”
junta
from Spanish junta literally “joint”; a board of joint administration; sometimes used to refer to military officers command in a coup d’état. As an adjective, it means “together”.

K

key
from Spanish cayo, from Taino cayo (this is English ‘key’/’cay’/’quay’ as in an island, reef or a linked series of them, not the ‘key’ with which one locks/unlocks)

L

LLanos, Los
from Spanish llano (plain); vast tropical grassland plain situated to the east of the Andes in Colombia and Venezuela.
lariat
from la reata, meaning “the strap, rein, or rope” from reatar (“to tie again”) from atar “to tie (up);” from Latin aparte, “to join.”[15]
lasso
via American English from Spanish lazo meaning “tie;” ultimately from Latin laqueum, “noose, snare.”[16]
llama
from Spanish llama, from Quechua llama
loco
from loco, “mad” or “crazy”
Lolita
from the diminutive for Lola, short for Dolores

M

macho
from macho, male, brave, the property of being overtly masculine. In Spanish is masculinity
majordomo
via Spanish mayordomo or Italian maggiordomo (both meaning “butller”) from Latin maior domus meaning “mayor of the place.”
matador
from matador meaning “killer” from matar (“to kill”) probably from Arabic مات mata meaning “he died”, also possibly cognate with Persian مردن mordan, “to die” as well as English “murder.” Another theory is that the word “matador” is derived from a combination of the Vulgar Latin mattāre, from Late Latin mactare (to slaughter, kill) and the Latin -tor (which is cognate with Greek τορ -tōr and Sanskrit तर -tar-.)[17]
mesa
from mesa, table. The corresponding Spanish word to a flat top mountain is meseta
mescal
from Spanish mezcal, from Nahuatl mexcalli
mesquite
from Mexican Spanish mezquite, from Nahuatl mizquitl
mestizo
from mestizo, “racially mixed.” in Spanish, refers to a person of mixed European-native American descent
mojito
dim. formed from “mojado” (wet or dripping) probably referring to the mint leaves in the well known Cuban drink
mole
from Spanish, from Nahuatl molle or molli (“sauce”)
Montana
from montaña, a mountain
mosquito
from mosquito, literally “little fly”
mulatto
from Spanish or Portuguese mulato meaning “octoroon, sambo”. in Spanish, refers to a person of mixed European-African descent. it is not derogatory
mustang
from mestengo or mesteño, “without known master or owner” (archaic)
mustee
from mestizo, “racially mixed.”

N

nacho
from Nacho, a nickname for the given name Ignacio, inventor of the snack
nada
from “Nada” meaning ” nothing.”
negro
from Spanish, Portuguese, or Italian negro, “black”, from Latin Nigrum (nom. Niger) and Greek Νέγρος Negros, both meaning “black.”.[18] In Spanish it is not derogatory.
Nevada
from Nevada literally “snowy”
nostromo
from nuestro amo, “our master”.

O

olé
an interjection, an expression of approval or triumph, similar to the Italian bravo (capable), by spectators of bull fights or football (soccer) matches
oregano
from orégano, “marjoram”

P

pachuco
from pachuco, “fancy-dresser.”
paella
from Spanish paella, from Valencian paella “pan” and originated in Latin patella, also meaning “pan.”
palmetto
from palmito, “palm heart, little palm”, diminutive form of the word for palm.
pampa
from Spanish, from Quechua pampa, plain
papaya
from japaya, akin to Arawak papáia
páramo
from Spanish páramo (moorland)
patio
from patio, inner courtyard, “an open paved area adjacent to a home”
peccadillo
from pecadillo, “small sin”
peccary
from Spanish pecarí, from Carib pakira or paquira.[19]
peon
from Spanish peón (“laborer”)
peyote
from Spanish, from Nahuatl peyotl (“caterpillar”)
Philippines
via Spanish Filipinas from Latin Philippinae, “islands of king Philip II of Spain”; ultimately from Greek Φιλιππίναι Philippinai from the Greek phrase Φίλος ίππος Νησιά Fílos Íppos Ni̱sí, “Islands of the Horse Friend.”
piccadill
from picadillo, “hash”
pimento or pimiento
from pimiento, “pepper.”
piña colada
from Spanish piña (pineapple), and colada, which means strained, from the Spanish verb colar (“to strain”)
piñata
from piñata (“jug, pot”) from Latin pinea, “pine cone.”[20]
pinta
from pinta, “he/she/it paints”; also archaic Spanish for pintada, “painted”
Piragua
from the combination of Spanish words Pirámide (“pyramid”) and Agua meaning “water”[21]
pisco
from pisco, “turkey”
placer mining
from placer, “sand bank”
platinum
from platina, “little silver” (now “Platino”)
playa
from playa, “beach”
plaza
from plaza, “public square, spot or place”
politico
from Spanish or Italian politico meaning “politician, political agent;”[22] ultimately from Latin politicus meaning “of citizens or the state, civil, civic,” from Greek πολιτικός (Ancient Greek: πολῑτικός) politikos, “of citizens or the state,” from πολίτης (plural: πολίτες) polites (citizen) from πόλις polis, “city.”[23]
poncho
from poncho, from Araucanian pontho meaning “woolen fabric.”[24]
potato
from European Spanish patata, itself from batata, “sweet potato”, from Taino and papa, “potato” from Quechua
pronto
from Spanish “soon, prompt”
pronunciamento
from pronunciamiento proclamation, “military coup d’état”, usually establishing a military dictatorship (often a junta)
puma
from Spanish “cougar, panther”, from Quechua
pueblo
via Castilian pueblo from Latin populus (“people”).

Q

quadroon
from cuarterón, “fourth”
quesadilla
from quesadilla loosely meaning a traditional Mexican dish made with tortillas and cheese, diminutive of “queso”, cheese.
Quetzal
from Spanish, from Nahuatl “quetzalli”: a group of colourful birds of the trogon family found in tropical regions of the Americas. It also may refer to Guatemalan quetzal, the currency of Guatemala.
quinoa
from Spanish quinua, from Quechua kinua
Quinceañera
From Spanish Quince años, literally: “fifteen years”; a girl’s fifteenth birthday celebration similar to a sweet sixteen; popular celebrations include trips to Disneyland, barbecues with the family and soccer matches at the park. A crucial ritual.
quirt
from Spanish cuarta literally: “quarter”; a short horseman’s whip, from “one fourth” (of a vara)

R

ranch
from rancho, a very small rural community, smaller than a town; also a very humble dwelling in South America.
reconquista
from reconquista, “reconquest”
remuda
from Mexican Spanish remudar, to exchange (horses)
renegade
from renegado, “turncoat, heretic, disowned”
robalo
from Spanish róbalo meaning “bass, sea wolf,” a tropical marine game and fish food
roble
from Spanish roble, a California oak tree
rodeo
from rodeo and verb rodear (to go around)
rumba
from rumba

S

saguaro
from saguaro, from Piman
salsa
from salsa, “sauce”
sapodilla
from zapotillo
sarabande
from French sarabande in turn from Spanish zarabanda
savanna
from sabana, “veld”, from Taino zabana
savvy
from Spanish or Portuguese sabe, “knows”; sabio, wise, learned.
shack
perhaps from Mexican Spanish jacal meaning “hut”, from Nahuatl xacalli
sherry
from Old Spanish Xerés [ʃeˈɾes], modern Spanish Jerez [xeˈɾeθ].
Sierra
from sierra, a saw
siesta
from siesta, “nap”, from Latin Sexta [hora] “sixth hour”
silo
from silo
sombrero
from sombrero (literally, shade maker), “hat”
stampede
from estampida
stockade
from a French derivation of the Spanish estocada, “stab”

T

taco
from taco, “plug”[25]
tamale
from Spanish tamales, pl. of tamal, from Nahuatl tamalli meaning dumpling made from corn flour
tango
from Spanish tango.
tapioca
from tapioca, “cassava”
ten-gallon hat
from Spanish tan galán meaning “so gallant (looking)”; alternate theory is the gallon of Texas English here is a misunderstanding of galón meaning braid
temblor
Spanish for trembling, or earthquake; from temblar, to shake, from Vulgar Latin *tremulāre, from Latin tremulus
tequila
from tequila
telenovela, or telenovella
from telenovela, “soap opera”
tilde
from tilde
tobacco
from Spanish (Nahuatl influenced) tabaco, “snuff”, .
tomatillo
from Spanish tomatillo, “small tomate” (see Physalis philadelphica)
tomato
from Spanish tomate, from Nahuatl xitomatl
torero
from toro, “bull”
tornado
from Spanish tronada, “thunderstorm”, influenced by tornar, “to turn”
tortilla
from tortilla, “little cake”. Currently means “omelet” in Spain; in Spanish America = small cake of either corn meal or wheat flour
tuna
from Spanish atún, from Arabic تون tun, from Latin thunnus, from Greek θύννος, thynnos (=tuna fish)
turista
from turista, “tourist”

V

vamoose
from vamos, meaning “let’s go”
vanilla
from Spanish vainilla, diminutive of Latin vaina, from vagina meaning “pod”[26]
Vertigo
from the Spanish word Vertigo
vicuña
from Spanish, from Quechua wikunna
vigilante
from Spanish vigilante, meaning “watchman.”

W

wop
from Italian guappone, from Spanish guapo, “handsome” or “attractive”.

Z

Zorro
from Spanish zorro, a fox, originally “smart”
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_English_words_of_Spanish_origin

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